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David Hällström

Canadian radon project chooses Radonova for analysis of radon samples

By | Measurement, News | No Comments

Swedish Radonova Laboratories has been commissioned to analyse radon samples in the major Canadian campaign “Evict Radon”. This campaign aims to reduce the incidence of radon in Canadian homes and lung cancer as a consequence of long-term exposure to radon gas. This campaign being conducted in the province of Alberta is headed by Dr Aaron Goodarzi at the University of Calgary.

Radon is measured for at least 90 days and analysed at Radonova’s laboratory. The results will form the basis for continued studies on how radon exposure affects the environment and the health of residents. The project involves doctors, biologists, geologists, architects and experts from a number of other fields. It is estimated that in parts of the province of Alberta, one in six homes is affected by radon. And every day one resident is diagnosed with lung cancer caused by radon.

May become a template for similar projects

“We are naturally proud that such a large and important project has chosen Radonova as its partner for analysis of its radon measurements. At the same time, we know that Radonova is the only operator with global ISO certification. We currently occupy a very prominent position when it comes to radon measurement and analysis. In this role we always want to play an active part in the work of reducing unhealthy exposure to radon. The Evict Radon campaign seems particularly important, as it is comprehensive and well planned. This means in turn that after the campaign has ended it can act as a template for similar projects,” says Karl Nilsson, CEO of Radonova Laboratories.

After smoking, radon is the most common cause of lung cancer. This makes radon a serious global health problem that every year leads to around 230,000 cases of lung cancer.

For further information about the Evict Radon campaign, visit Evict radon

For further information about radon and radon measurement, visit our FAQ

evict radon

COIRA chooses radon detectors from Radonova for major international study

By | Measurement, News | No Comments

Radonova Laboratories will be providing radon detectors to a major international study to be run by COIRA (the Coalition of International Radon Associations). The aim of the project is to compare radon measurement results obtained by the world’s leading monitoring institutions in the field of radiation protection. The project started in August 2018 and will run for two years.

“This is a very important project. It will help us towards a more consistent way of working and greater precision in our work on radon measurements. COIRA provides a forum for the collective global expertise on radon. We are pleased to be an active part of this forum in terms of both measuring equipment and knowledge,” says Karl Nilsson, a member of the board of COIRA and CEO of Radonova Laboratories.
coira

Radonova’s radon specialist José-Luis Gutiérrez Villanueva is a member of the project committee. He is there as an expert and representative of ERA (the European Radon Association), one of the project’s scientific coordinators (COIRA). Gutiérrez Villanueva is also involved in the work of analysing the data collected.

“Such a comprehensive comparative study means that we can expect to have access to reference tools within a few years.  This will make radon monitoring safer and more effective,” he explains.

COIRA was formed in 2015 and has five member associations: ERA (the European Radon Association), AARST (the American Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists), CARST (the Canadian Association of Radon Scientists and Technologists), UKRA (the UK Radon Association) and NGRA (the Nordic Group of Radon Associations).

For more information on the project, visit www.coiraradon.com.

You can read more about Radonova here.

House – Why does radon exist in homes and where does radon come from?

By | Home | No Comments

When you own a house or intend to buy a house, you often hear talk about radon values and the fact that you need to check them for health reasons. But where does radon come from?

Radon is a gas that occurs naturally in soil and in bedrock. It is a so-called “inert” gas and is an element with the chemical symbol Rn and atomic number 86 in the periodic table. The property that makes radon damaging to health is the fact that it is a radioactive substance. Radioactivity means that radon emits radiation, so-called “ionising” radiation which affects biological systems. The element radon is part of the decay chain, which includes the elements uranium and radium (which are also radioactive).
Ionising radiation can damage cells and cause cell death and can destroy DNA molecules in the body. Which can lead to mutations and therefore to cancer. Lung cancer in particular is a form of cancer that can be caused by radon radiation.

Where does radon in a house come from?

Radon originally comes from uranium and radium, which occur naturally in bedrock. If a building is constructed on such land, and particularly if the building also has a basement, there can be a problem with radon. The parts of the building that come into contact with the ground can let in radon from the surroundings if they are not sealed.

Investigation and measurement

It is easy to measure and investigate radon in a home. A radon laboratory will help by sending out measurement boxes for radon. You simply hang these from the ceiling in the rooms you want to measure radon in. The measurement must go on for a few months. Then the radon boxes are sent in to the laboratory for analysis and you get a radon value for each room. The limit value for radon is currently 300 Bq/m3 in dwellings. If it is higher than that, you should carry out some form of radon degasification.

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Important to measure radon regardless of where you live

By | Home, Multi family building | No Comments

Internationally, there are radon maps that show which areas are more exposed to radon and which are less exposed. Consequently, many people do not measure radon because they think they live in a radon-free area, but that is wrong. Almost all countries are exposed to radon and considerable local differences can exist within the residential areas. That is confirmed by studies carried out by Radonova in which the results from the same residential area were examined. That is why it is always important to measure radon and not rely on radon maps.

Why are there such large local differences in radon content?

It is due to variations in radon in the ground and how buildings are constructed, what maintenance they have had and what rebuilding has taken place.

The levels of radon in the ground depend on factors such as the extent to which the elements uranium and radium are present in our rock types and therefore also our soil types. Radon gas is formed from these elements and is transported through the soil layer with the aid of air and ground water. This means, for example, that there is a greater risk of radon in buildings constructed on sand and gravel. These highly porous soil types contain large amounts of air that can easily transport radon up into buildings.

Important – Where does radon leak into houses?

Radon from the ground leaks into houses and apartment blocks in many different ways. Unsealed penetrations in the form of incoming electricity and water supplies enable radon to leak into the building. A concrete pad with cracks can also allow radon to leak in.

These causes mean that there can be considerable local variations in the radon content in residential areas. It is therefore always important to measure the radon content in indoor air, regardless of where you live and how you live – in a house or in an apartment building.

important

Radonova uses date-marking for even safer measurement

By | Measurement, News | No Comments
date-marking

Radonova Laboratories introduces date-marking for the detectors used in radon monitoring. Together with the recently launched vacuum packaging, the date-mark ensures that the monitoring and analysis work can be carried out with the utmost reliability.

Tryggve Rönnqvist, technical manager at Radonova Laboratories, describes the benefits of date-marking the detectors:

“By date-marking each individual pack, we further increase the measurement certainty of short-term monitoring. If radon monitoring is carried out over seven to ten days after the detector has been stored for a year, this could have some effect on the result. Quite simply, it’s more difficult to measure lower concentrations reliably if the monitoring period is short and the storage time is long. Even though we’re talking about small deviations, we always strive to give our customers the most accurate monitoring results possible.”

Easier for stockists and customers with their own stock of detectors

“Above all, data-marketing makes life easier for international stockists and customers who have their own stock of radon detectors. Now they can quickly see how old the detectors are and optimise their warehouse logistics accordingly. Real estate agents are another good example of businesses that benefit from clear date-marking. Monitoring is often fast and frequent in this segment and many agents, therefore, often have their own supply of detectors. With date-marking, we’ve made it easier to use the detectors in the right order.

“Although our monitoring is already at the very forefront of reliability, clear data-marking of each detector and the newly introduced vacuum packaging helps us to offer even simpler, more reliable radon monitoring.

Radonova Laboratories is introducing date-marking on its detectors in November 2018. The newly launched vacuum packaging provides a maximum storage time of eight months. Both for short-term monitoring and three years for long-term monitoring. Radonova also recommends beginning long-term monitoring within 18 months because the measurement uncertainty decreases the sooner monitoring begins.

For further information about radon and radon monitoring, contact us here

How do you measure radon?

By | Measurement | No Comments

Radon is a so-called “inert” gas that is also radioactive. In other words it emits ionising radiation. If people suffer excessive exposure to this radiation in their workplace or at home, it can lead to cell damage and therefore to cancer. It is estimated that up to 14% of all cases of lung cancer in the world are caused by radon. measurements are crucial.

Radon comes from the ground

Radon occurs naturally in the ground since it comes from uranium that decays. Buildings that have basements and that are otherwise in direct contact with the ground are most affected by radon.

Radon is measured using boxes

Radon is normally measured using what are referred to as “radon boxes”. These are small boxes that you place around the home or in the workplace for a certain period of time. This is to see the specific radon value in the specific rooms where the measurement is being carried out.

This means that it is best to place radon boxes in rooms where you spend a lot of time such as bedrooms and living rooms. In rooms in which you or people around you spend the most time, it may be worth placing two boxes in different parts of the room to obtain the most accurate measurement possible.

Quick measurement or long-term measurements

There are two different types of boxes that you can use for radon measurement. The first of these is the box that carries out long-term measurement that most people are familiar with. A so-called “long-term measurement” enables you to obtain an average annual value for radon levels in indoor air. It is only possible to carry out long-term measurements of radon during the winter months. This is because people do not ventilate as frequently as in summer, which concentrates the radon and, in turn, provides an optimum measurement. Long-term measurements take approximately two to three months and all you need to do is position the boxes. Then leave them there for the full period before sending them back.

For people who do not have the time required to carry out long-term measurements, there are also boxes that provide a quick measurement. These do not show the average amount of radon in a year, but can provide a quick indication of the property’s approximate exposure to radon. They are suitable for people who want to buy a house or another property. Quick measurements take up to 10 twenty-four hour periods and can be carried out at any time of year.

After the measurement

When the period of time for the selected boxes has ended, you simply send in the boxes. You then receive a full report on the results. This usually takes only one week to send out.

measurements

Ecotrak® – radon measurement in soil

By | Measurement, News | No Comments

Radonova launches a new product for safe radon monitoring in soil

Radonova Laboratories is launching a new detector that makes it safer and easier to monitor radon in soil. The new Ecotrak® detector can be used ahead of new builds and property modernisations and provides quick, reliable information on the amount of radon in the soil being tested.

Unlike other commonly used soil detectors, Ecotrak® is covered by international comparative tests. The detector is supplied in a Tyvek bag, which protects against moisture, dirt and other factors that could affect the result.

Ecotrak®

Ecotrak® does not have to be returned for immediate analysis, rather it can be collected and stored at stockists for a short period. This enables more streamlined handling and means that detectors from several different monitoring periods can be sent for analysis at the same time.

“Monitoring radon in soil is relatively simple. The challenge is to monitor it in such a way as to provide a reliable result. In part, this means that the product itself has to be high quality. Also able to withstand the stresses that are part and parcel of monitoring in soil. However, it also means using an accredited laboratory that takes part in international tests. This enables us to carry out fact-based comparisons with large amounts of reference data,” says Karl Nilsson, CEO of Radonova Laboratories.

“By launching the new detector, we’re making it simpler and safer than ever to monitor radon in soil. No matter what type of construction is involved, there’s great value in understanding the radon situation. What’s more, in some cases the local building committee requires a study into radon levels before granting building permits. Should monitoring show that the site is what’s termed ‘high risk’, the construction can be made radon-proof from the beginning,” says Oskar Boström, product manager at Radonova Laboratories.

Ground radon in brief

Uranium and radium are the two elements that contribute to the levels of radon gas found in soil. Levels of radon gas can vary widely depending on the type of soil. As a general rule, the airier the soil composition, the higher the level of radon. Conversely, a more compact composition makes it more difficult for the radon to circulate in the soil.

Ecotrak® in brief

  • Covered by stringent international comparative studies
  • Not sensitive to moisture (large amounts of water do, however, affect the results)
  • Supplied in a protective Tyvek bag
  • Can be collected and stored for a short period (for efficient handling of multiple measurements)
  • Monitoring usually takes place over one to seven days
  • Can be used all year round (provided the soil is free of frost)

The recommendation is to use at least three detectors for the first 100 m² of the site where the property or construction will stand. After that it’s a good idea to have at least one extra detector per extra 50 m².

For further information about the new Ecotrak® detector, contact Radonova here

Why is radon dangerous?

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dangerous

You often carry out a radon measurement when buying houses and properties. But what is radon and why do you need to measure it and why is it dangerous?

Radon is dangerous

Radon is an element with atomic number 86 and the chemical symbol of Rn. It is a so-called “inert” gas, which means that it exists in a gaseous state at room temperature and that the element radon does not readily react with other substances. However, radon gas is radioactive and decays by itself. When the radon decays, it emits ionising radiation containing dangerous alpha particles.

Ionising radiation

Ionisation means that electrons are removed from a nucleus by means of radiation, for example. The atoms, which were previously in equilibrium, then become charged ions which are able to react with other atoms or ions. Such reactions can damage and/or alter a DNA molecule and cause mutations or cancer or can kill cells. For that reason, ionising radiation, and therefore radon, is dangerous to humans.

Why are you exposed to radon in a building?

In its normal form, as stated above, radon exists as a gas. Isn’t it just a matter of airing the building to let the radon out? Yes, in a way it is. Some types of radon problem are solved just through ventilation. But, unfortunately, the gas fills up constantly if a building is constructed on ground that causes radon gas to form.

Radon derives from a “decay chain”, i.e. other radioactive substances decay and form new substances. Uranium and radium, two radioactive elements that exist in certain types of bedrock, are present earlier in this chain. In areas with high uranium levels or radium-rich ground, the risk of so-called “soil radon” will be higher. Radon is particularly common in buildings with basements because the walls are more exposed to the surrounding ground.

Long-term effects and radiation doses

Elevated radon levels in a building can cause an increased risk of cancer and particularly of lung cancer. When you live and spend a lot of time in the building, radon can gradually cause harm. However, the risk is very small for non-smokers. Nowadays, it is recommended that the radon level should be no higher than 300 Bq/m3 in rooms in which you spend a lot of time (WHO is recommending no more than 100 Bq/m3). If the value is higher, you should take action to deal with the radon problem, for example through ventilation or sealing against incoming soil radon.

Acquisition of Gammadata provides Radonova with a Complete Program for Radon Measurement

By | Measurement, News | No Comments

By acquiring the radon measurement instrument division of Gammadata Instruments, Radonova Laboratories has further strengthened its position as a world leader in home and workplace radon measurement. Through the acquisition, Radonova has added several advanced instruments and products to its portfolio. Broadening its range of radon measurement technologies.

By offering a comprehensive program for radon measurement, Radonova is responding to the global demand for safe and efficient radon measurements in homes and workplaces.

“With this acquisition, we get access to leading edge products which are at the absolute forefront of research and development. For example, ATMOS, the world’s most sensitive radon sniffer. We now have an expanded portfolio of instruments and products. We are in a position where we can offer new and existing customers an optimal radon measurement program. Particularly in the rapidly growing European market of workplace radon measurement,” says Radonova Laboratories CEO Karl Nilsson. One of Gammadata’s founders, Dag Sedin, has 30 years of experience in instrument development for radiation measurement. He will take on the role of consultant at Radonova Laboratories. Dag comments on the acquisition:

“As we are now part of Radonova Laboratories, there is enormous potential for intensifying our research to ensure that we continue to deliver the most innovative radon instruments and sensors available on the market. Radonova provides us with a great platform to further develop the new product lines we have in the pipeline. The first of these will be an update to the ATMOS radon sniffer. In addition, Radonova has an established export network that will provide numerous new opportunities for growth when new products are released.”

For more information on radon and radon measurement visit www.radonovalaboratories.com

For more information, please contact Karl Nilsson, CEO of Radonova Laboratories AB Phone: +46 (0)70-639 01 31, E-mail: karl.nilsson@radonova.com

Acquisition

The world’s most sensitive radon sniffer ATMOS is now becoming part of Radonova’s extensive program for radon measurements.

Radon Entry Points – Basement

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Below Grade Windows
Sump Pump
Cracks in Foundation Walls
Footing
Cracks in Concrete Slab
Floor Drains
Support Posts

Many homes have basement areas. Whether finished or not there is always a potential for radon to enter your home through the basement. Not all homes will have every radon entry point shown, but the image shows the most common ones. Any one of these entry points could contribute to a high radon gas level in the home.

Testing for radon is the only  way to know if your home has high levels of dangerous radon gas, a class A carcinogen that causes lung cancer.

Test Your Home Today!