Quality aspects

You can make demands on us. We do that ourselves, together with SWEDAC (the Swedish Board for Accreditation and Conformity Assessment), DNV (Det Norske Veritas) and Technical inspectors from the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority.

When you turn to us, you can be confident that:

  • Our measuring equipment is checked and calibrated regularly
  • Our employees are highly qualified and competent
  • We take part in national and international intercomparison tests
  • The measurements we perform are of the highest quality

Radonova is accredited by SWEDAC.

What does accreditation mean?

Accreditation by SWEDAC (the Swedish Board for Accreditation and Conformity Assessment) provides proof that the competence of our laboratory has been scrutinised, assessed against European and international standards, and confirmed by an independent state body. It also entails ongoing monitoring by SWEDAC of the company’s competence to conduct the testing for which it has been accredited. A decision to grant accreditation means, among other things, that Radonova meets the requirements set out in the international quality standard ISO 17025. Radonova has had a testing laboratory accredited by SWEDAC since October 1995.

Why seek accreditation?

Accreditation defines a level of quality which a company’s activities are to achieve. It makes demands in terms of the quality system and competence of the company. Documentation is examined and an assessment is made on site. Accreditation provides a structured framework for the company’s activities and minimises the risk of errors. An organisation that is accredited is able to demonstrate its competence, in Sweden and internationally.

What does our accreditation mean for you?

  • Auditors from SWEDAC and technical inspectors from the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority monitor and assess whether the laboratory’s accredited measurement methods are being maintained and whether Radonova meets the requirements of the international quality standard ISO 17025
  • Our measuring equipment is checked and calibrated
  • Our employees demonstrate a high level of competence
  • We participate in national and international intercomparisons
  • We have responsible investigators, as required by the Swedish National Food Administration
  • The test results you obtain from us are of the highest quality

Accredited methods of measurement

Our laboratory has been accredited (no. 1489) since autumn 1995 for the following areas of activity, methods and measurement limits:

Measurements of radioactive caesium in foodstuffs, liquids and solids using gamma spectroscopy
Lower measurement limit with a measurement time of 1 minute 3 Bq
Upper measurement limit with a measurement time of 1 minute 25,000 Bq
Measurements of radon in water using gamma spectroscopy
Lower measurement limit with a measurement time of 15 minutes 4 Bq
Upper measurement limit with a measurement time of 15 minutes 25,000 Bq
Measurements of radon in indoor air using enclosed detector film with a filter (measurements of annual mean concentrations)
Lower measurement limit with an exposure period of 3 months 20 Bq/m3
Upper measurement limit with an exposure period of 3 months 25,000 Bq/m3
Measurements of radon in indoor air using enclosed detector film with a filter (advisory short-term measurements)
Lower measurement limit with an exposure period of 7 days 70 Bq/m3
Upper measurement limit with an exposure period of 7 days: 150,000 Bq/m3
Measurements of radon in indoor air using a dosimeter
Measurement range 40 – 50,000 kBqh/m3

Gamma spectroscopy, which is used for the measurement of radioactive caesium in foodstuffs, liquids and solids, and of radon in water, is a recognised method.

Enclosed detector film with a filter, the method employed to measure radon in indoor air, follows the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority’s method description “Long-term measurement for the estimation of annual mean concentrations of radon (i2005:1)”, using the measurement and calibration procedure described in method sheet no. 1: “Detector film with filter”.

The method employed to measure radon in indoor air using a dosimeter follows the Swedish Radiation Protection Authority’s Method description for the measurement of radon in the workplace (i2004:1).

OUR CONTACT PERSON
Lars Burman
Environment and Quality Manager

Phone: +46 (0) 702 467 282